sovay: (Viktor & Mordecai)
[personal profile] sovay
I was taking pictures of the cats.

Autolycus had opinions about the camera.



[personal profile] spatch says, "This is what I see every morning at seven-thirty!"
Sep. 23rd, 2017 01:19 am

[personal profile] archangelbeth on cats

conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly posting in [community profile] metaquotes
Cats can reproduce by budding. Make sure to dispose of all brushed fur properly.

Context needs to comb her cat more often.
sovay: (Otachi: Pacific Rim)
[personal profile] sovay
In about an hour, I am going to see Howard the Duck (1986) on 70 mm at the Somerville Theatre. It's part of their second annual 70 mm & Widescreen Festival, which started this Wednesday and runs through the rest of the month; last year it offered me such superlative viewing experiences as Lord Jim (1965), Spartacus (1960), Sleeping Beauty (1959) and Tron (1982), and this year I am starting with a duck from another planet. We're meeting my parents for it. My father unironically loves Howard the Duck. He ranks it with '80's cult classics like The Adventures of Buckaroo Banzai Across the 8th Dimension (1984) and has always felt it deserved a sequel. I have not seen it since high school at the latest and have peculiarly fragmentary memories of the plot. The opening sequence is picture-clear: Howard on his home planet greeting a Playduck centerfold with "My little airbrushed beauty!" before being sucked through space and time into Cleveland, Ohio where he rescues a new wave chick from some lowlifes with the ancient martial art of "Quack Fu." She has a band. I want to say he ends up managing it. After that things start to break up. I remember that an eldritch thing possesses Jeffrey Jones—and that it happens for the decently Lovecraftian reason that it is never a bright idea to open a door at random into the deep reaches of space when you don't know what might be on the other side—but I don't remember the mechanism or the immediate consequences, except that I have the vague sense of a road trip. I remember that Chip Zien voices Howard, when I know him much better for his work in musical theater. IMDb tells me that this movie was also the first place I saw Lea Thompson and Tim Robbins. I'm really looking forward. Other films I am planning to catch on 70 mm include Wonder Woman (2017) and Cleopatra (1963), which should really be something on a big screen, as should an IB Technicolor VistaVision print of North by Northwest (1959). I am a little sorry to have missed The Dark Crystal (1982) earlier this evening, but it has been a long and stressful day. There's always the matinée repeat on Sunday if I really feel like it. In the meantime, there's a space duck.

[edit] Yeah, sorry, haters. Howard the Duck remains a really delightful sci-fi comedy. Lea Thompson makes a surprisingly credible new wave/punk frontwoman. Tim Robbins is so young and so gangly. Jeffrey Jones is no Emilio Lizardo, but he chews good scenery as the possessed scientist. There are practical effects. There is stop-motion. (There are too many fight scenes and things blowing up, but I feel this way about most movies with any action quotient.) And there is a road trip, with a pit stop at a nuclear power plant. The script is sweet and full of consciously comic-book dialogue and it plays its interspecies romance straight; the only joke that really pulled me up short was a tossed-off sex-change line which mercifully goes by fast. I can't imagine swapping out any of the actors, especially Zien. I had completely forgotten about Richard Kiley as the introductory narrator, B-movie style. I don't even think it's an enjoyably bad movie: I just like it. And I have seen perhaps the last remaining 70 mm print in the world. No regrets.
Sep. 22nd, 2017 05:35 pm

FFA DW Post # 740 - New Meme Rules

sunnymodffa: (Seal of Earnestness)
[personal profile] sunnymodffa posting in [community profile] fail_fandomanon
Good Omens threads must have hairwank


New Rule updates:
-All US Politics must stick to one thread and that thread must be clearly labelled as such.
-For a wide variety of reasons, no deliberate variant fonts, no emoji in thread titles. You can use them in the comment, but not in the title.

All the [community profile] fail_fandomanon Rules and Information (and Ban Requests): http://fail-fandomanon.dreamwidth.org/1076.html. The short version: no embeds, don't out people's real names, don't be that much of an asshole, body fluids are off topic, Mods reserve the right to freeze, screen, and delete the fuck out of stuff. FFA discussion covers a wide variety of topics and has a very flexible view of 'fandom' that includes politics, current events, and cooking techniques. FFA is a Choose NOT to Warn experience. Meme away.

Other posts and resources relevant to your interests:

NB: Meme rules do not require spoiler cuts/white-text/etc. Though, if you want to use spoiler cuts, a wonderful nonnie found a way to add them to DW. Just use the code below.
<div tabindex="-1"><b>spoiler title</b><div>Some spoilery content.</div></div>
See here for a detailed explanation and caveats.

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A temporary ban on 'Disruptive and Provocative Opinions' threads is now in force.

Dreamwidth has gone https on meme! Fix for DW Blocker - Fix for LJ New Comments

Sep. 22nd, 2017 05:07 pm

(no subject)

dark_phoenix54: (snooch scream)
[personal profile] dark_phoenix54
Despite being snotty and germ-ridden, I went into town to run errands today. Cat food from the vet (and free Krispy Kreme donut!), blood test strips, the library. The library held some excitement for me, as the elevator got stuck with me inside. Coming down it jerked hard and stopped- in between floors. Over the next ten or fifteen minutes, it groaned, jerked, vibrated, and generally acted possessed. Well, I thought, at least I have stuff to read, but I sure wish I'd taken a pee! I finally figured that things weren't getting any better, and hit the 'call' switch. Of course, at that point, the damn thing dropped again and the doors opened. A couple of the librarians were out there, because they could hear the ruckus the thing was making.

Hopefully will feel good enough to go to work tomorrow as it's supposed to *not* be raining.
tassosss: (Default)
[personal profile] tassosss
And speaking of slogging along. I mean, I love this series and I'm glad I've got some momentum on it, but it has been work to get it going again.

Sunday Dinner: Melissa (2312 words) by Tassos
Chapters: 1/1
Fandom: Teen Wolf (TV)
Rating: General Audiences
Warnings: No Archive Warnings Apply
Characters: Sheriff Stilinski, Melissa McCall
Additional Tags: Werewolf Sheriff Stilinski, Dinner, Friendship, Male-Female Friendship, Conversations, Alternate Universe - Canon Divergence
Series: Part 6 of Lycanthropic Optics: Werewolf!Sheriff AU
Summary:

John bumps into Melissa at the hospital. They have a long overdue chat.


Sep. 22nd, 2017 07:19 pm

writing is a thing again

tassosss: (Default)
[personal profile] tassosss
So you know I've been complaining for months about how writing is like pulling teeth? I've been slogging along, working on finishing half finished things (and succeeding), poking at a couple new ideas that haven't stuck, and it's all felt like work and drudgery. Until, this week. When I started an Avvar!Cullen/mage!Trevelyan romance that is all about the dubcon and in basically two sittings have gotten out 5,000 words.

Let's back up. I've basically been writing a little over 5k words a month this year, with some variation, and definitely not in two days. And it wasn't even hard! What is that even? Writing? Not a painful exercise? (Sidenote: on top of that writing at work has been pretty good this week too...)

So, yeah, writing is suddenly fun again. Also, witness me be incredibly uncomfortable writing my own kinks. I mean, lbr, this is an idfic romance at the moment (though with my usual over thinking of how to make the situation work). It's also basically the first part of 7 Brides for 7 Brothers, which makes me feel a little weird 'cause I don't actually like the movie, but, man, I sure as hell love Avvar!AUs, and forced closeness, and bedsharing, and a marriage of convenience, and ALL THE SILLY TROPES. I just prefer reading them to writing them. So I'm trying something new here. It'll help me grow as a person.

Anyway, I'm already worried about finishing it. This is the same feeling I've gotten starting the other three novel length fics that are about half done at ~60k. I'm hoping this one won't be that long. And that I finish it. Wish me luck.

Sep. 22nd, 2017 05:39 pm

Friday, September 22, 2017

laundrybaskets: laundry (Default)
[personal profile] laundrybaskets posting in [community profile] exercise_every_day
You know the drill. If you exercised today, please comment and inspire the rest of us to get moving.

Have a great day!
Sep. 22nd, 2017 05:52 pm

[ SECRET POST #3915 ]

case: (Default)
[personal profile] case posting in [community profile] fandomsecrets

⌈ Secret Post #3915 ⌋

Warning: Some secrets are NOT worksafe and may contain SPOILERS.

01.


More! )


Notes:

Secrets Left to Post: 00 pages, 00 secrets from Secret Submission Post #560.
Secrets Not Posted: [ 0 - broken links ], [ 0 - not!secrets ], [ 0 - not!fandom ], [ 0 - too big ], [ 0 - repeat ].
Current Secret Submissions Post: here.
Suggestions, comments, and concerns should go here.
Sep. 22nd, 2017 02:24 pm

(no subject)

neonhummingbird: (Default)
[personal profile] neonhummingbird
Had my follow-up with The Lovely Travis this morning and GOT MY STITCHES OUT! I can take a real shower that doesn't involve using cling wrap to protect my incisions! I can wash my hair! So exciting!

Everything else is going well; my post-surgery range of motion is pretty darn good and I am optimistic about how long it will take me to recover. That said, I am still typing one-handed, and my sling is a terrible pain in the butt. But it keeps me from doing stupid things by reflex, so... (Travis is doing surgery on Monday on a guy who decided not to wear his sling and tried to catch something. Perhaps I should say, re-doing surgery. :P)

I'm sadly getting a lot of headaches, between not being able to do my usual shoulder PT and wearing the damn sling, and I get tired pretty easily still. But it's going okay.

On the computer front, my tablet has a loose display wire (I think) and my Mac is in reboot hell. I have a few more tricks to try with the Mac tonight, as none of the usual tricks work, and an appointment at the Genius Bar tomorrow if those don't work.
Sep. 22nd, 2017 08:01 pm

Thread

elisi: (OMG!!!)
[personal profile] elisi
Originally posted by [profile] xkcd_rss at Thread
Tags:
musesfool: close up of the Chrysler Building (home)
[personal profile] musesfool
This morning I met up with boss3 to do a site visit at a conference space in the Empire State Building and gosh, it was a beautiful room. I say site visit like the meeting is not actually taking place there next week (it is); it was more to introduce me to the staff on site since boss3 will be away and I will be staffing the meeting. Just like my meeting planner days! Now I have to put together the BEOs for the caterer etc. It's so fun! If I only ever had to do meetings in NYC, I would go back to meeting planning. It was the travel that killed me. Among other things. (uh, the building on my icon is the Chrysler Building, but you get the idea.)

I hadn't been to the Empire State Building since I was a kid, and [tumblr.com profile] angelgazing was like, "Why even live in NYC if you don't go to the attractions?" and I was like, "I've never even been to the Statue of Liberty." *hands* Generally speaking, the thought of masses of tourists repels more than the attractions attract. Unless someone from out of town wants to go, I generally don't do those kinds of things, though they are always fun when I do.

Anyway. The Good Place had its season 2 premiere Wednesday night, but it started at 10 pm and when I saw that I was like, "oh hell no!" I am not cut out for 10 pm shows anymore. So I set the DVR and watched it last night.

Spoilers from here on out! Please don't read if you haven't watched. It's a show that works best unspoiled the first time around! spoilers for all of s1 and the s2 premiere )

[personal profile] rachelmanija has a much more thoughtful post here.

***
selenak: (Schreiben by Poisoninjest)
[personal profile] selenak
Back when I marathon-read Philip Kerr's Bernie Gunther series, I saw he's also authored a lot of novels for children, and had a new one coming out this month, a standalone called Frederick the Great Detective, which, however, mysteriously seems to be available in German before it is in English. (Mysterious because Kerr's Scottish and writes in English, and the novel, which got released today, is indeed translated from the English original, I checked the imprint.) Anyway, the novel has a very similar premise to a movie I saw at last year's Munich Film Festival, Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday - the review I wrote about the film is here: boy falls in love with Emil and the Detectives, befriends its author, Erich Kästner, in the twilight of the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich ensues, boy tries to maintain ideals of novel versus increasingly awful reality. Having read the novel now, I can add a further parallel: both Friedrich in Frederick the Great Detective and Hans in Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday have an older sibling who is enthusastically joining the Nazi cause. My original suspicion as to why Kerr picked a fictional main character instead of Hans, who actually existed and did befriend Erich Kästner, was because Hans' fate was sealed by history, and that Kerr wanted a better fate for his young hero. Spoilers ensue. )However, by that point, I had already guessed various other reasons why Kerr chose a fictional over a fictionalized "real" main character, and the differences to Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday are instructive here.

For starters, there's the difference in focus: Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday is, as far as Hans is concerned, a coming of age story - he goes from child to teenager and young man in the course of the story - and has Erich Kästner as the other lead, whose perspective through the movie is even the slightly favored one. Frederick the Great Detective, by contrast, has Kästner only as a supporting character, aside from a prologue and an epilogue ends in late 1933/early 1934, and is above all a homage to Kästner's novel in structure, focusing on Friedrich and his same-age friends, who play detectives until it gets lethally dangerous. (The adults, whether benevolent or malignant or in between, are seen from the outside, the point of view is Friedrich's throughout.) For, befitting the author of the Gunther mysteries, there are actually cases to solve. (Though as opposed to Bernie, young Friedrich - who wants to become a detective through much of the novel - gets the point that you can't be a detective in a system where the criminals have taken over when Kästner desperately tells him just this.)

Indeed, while reading I wondered whether the basic idea for the novel might not have been a wish to write a sequel to Emil which tackles how Emil & Co. would act when the Third Reich starts, because Friedrich's gang with its twins has some similarities. Then again, Friedrich has a distinctly different background to Emil (or Hans Löhr) - no working class single parent mother, instead, middle class parents with his father a journalist and friend of Kästner's, which is the original connection, which allows Kerr to depict the way the press lost its freedom within a year. It also allows Kerr to let Friedrich and his parents vacation on Rügen where Friedrich meets Christopher Isherwood and Isherwood's boyfriend Heinz on the beach. (Leading to a charming scene where Friedrich manages to solve his very first case by finding Isherwood's lost watch.) Kerr provides quite a lot of real life characters making cameos throughout the novel - Billy Wilder (during the premiere of the "Emil and the Detectives" movie version which he scripted), Max Liebermann, Dietrich Bonhoeffer, Walter Trier etc. - but the Isherwood cameo was for me the most vivid of these. (And I'm not surprised, having come across an interview where Kerr says bascially Berlin for him as a reader, before he got there, was invented by two British writers, Christopher Isherwood and John Le Carré.)

Kästner himself lis of course the real life character with the most page time, but he feels more like a generic version of Kästner's author persona than an actual attempt at depiction of the man. (As opposed to the Kästner in Erich Kästner and Little Tuesday.) Meaning: he's a benevolent adult the way, say, Justus the Teacher in "Das Fliegende Klassenzimmer" is, with no hint of any inner conflicts, and Kerr slims down the biographical and authorial data about him to "wrote Emil and the Detective, also works as a journalist"; in this book, there are no mentions of either Kästner's other books for children or his adult novel, Fabian (the one who got burned by the Nazis at the 1933 book burning), nor of his sharp political poetry (which in Germany he was and is almost as well known for as for his prose). (Hence ahistorically Emil ends up as the burned book, when in rl Emil and the Detectives was so popular that it got published, as the only one of Kästner's works, within Germany until 1936. Then it was for the axe as well.) The one biographical background fact about Kästner mentioned in conversation by Friedrich's father is in fact a wrong one, or rather, a wrong assumption, that Kästner's mother, like Emil's, raised her son alone. In rl, not only was Kästner's father around and in contact with his son, but he outlived Kästner's mother. There is, however, a reason why I didn't mind this particular wrong statement, which is: Kästner kept his father and his relationship with him very low key as long as his mother was still alive, while his relationship with his mother was intense and very public, so a colleague from work like Friedrich's father could be forgiven for assuming the guy was either dead or had left the family. ( If you've read Kästner's autobiographical writings, one of the most memorable childhood scenes which makes you cringe in sympathy is his parents' christmas competition about him, when his father, a craftsman, proudly presented presents he made with his own hand while his mother spent all her money on presents, and both parents would regard whichever present their son showed any favour to as proof whom he loved more or a rejection respectively. And thus it went on for as long as Kästner's mother lived.)

What the novel does really well, though, is presenting a group of children responding to their world changing radically, and Friedrich as a likeable child hero who ends up rejecting the demagogery, scapegoating and promise of glory that lures his older brother in because he sees how both people he knows and strangers are abused in its name. Again, in an homage to Kästner's novel which has a memorable dream sequence, Friedrich's ongoing crisis of conscience and wonder how to avoid becoming a Nazi himself climaxes in a surreal dream where the various things he has experienced come together. The lesson he draws from this is simple and profound at the same time, very Kästnerian and indeed great advice in current day circumstances as well, to the question as ow to act: Be kind. Being kind and you can't become what you fear and hate. Be kind.

Mind you, the 1945 prologue and epilogue does spoilery things ) But all in all, Frederick the Great Detective is still a very readable children's novel set in a dark time which also manages to pay homage to a classic while being its own thing.
Sep. 22nd, 2017 07:15 am

I have given in to Wynonna Earp

chelseagirl: Alice -- Tenniel (Default)
[personal profile] chelseagirl
OK, y'all have convinced me -- well, y'all along with someone in my book group who talks about it a lot -- to check it out. I'm only on s. 1 e. 6, so I am going to say naive things, but . . .

Wow, is this show cheesetastic. I can see why my partner gave up after episode 1, when it first aired. But then, I watched Lost Girl, so clearly kickass women, a sense of humor, and sex positivity go pretty far with me, especially if the cheese is that special Canadian brand. I'm definitely caught up in it.

It doesn't hurt that I am going through a Western phase at the moment -- someone watch Strange Empire on Netflix so I have someone to talk about it with, please? Of course I am most fascinated by Doc, since he's actually *from* the Old West and since I'm always fascinated by out-of-time characters. Especially since he has a little bit of a Timothy Olyphant in Deadwood combined with Timothy Olyphant in Justified thing going. (Hell, I watched Santa Clarita Diet for Timothy Olyphant.) I'm sure I can't trust him as far as I can throw him, though, and I mean me, not Wynonna, and I can throw way less far than she can.

Wynnona clearly gets her clothes in the same place that Jessica Jones gets hers. In fact, my first reaction was that this was kinda ilke a Western JJ, if Jessica hung out with Willow Rosenberg instead of Trish Walker. I mean, Wynonna has a different personality, but a lot of traits in common with Jess.

I am spoiled enough to know about later ships. But I would like to know why any character who is a) attractive and b) not directly or ancestrally connected to the OK Corral incident has a ridiculous name like Dolls or Haught-pronounced-Hot? I know this has its origins in a graphic novel (mostly because I read it in the credits), but it's distracting.

Also, Canada should make all the Westerns, modern or past, because Scenery.
Sep. 22nd, 2017 12:11 pm

New Xena Vid: Airplane

frayadjacent: Xena and Gab walking/riding away together, text says "Journeys" (Xena: Journey)
[personal profile] frayadjacent posting in [community profile] vidding
Title: Airplane
Fandom: Xena Warrior Princess
Vidder: [personal profile] frayadjacent 
Song: Airplane (edited for length) by The Indigo Girls
Characters: Gabrielle, Argo, Xena
Summary: Travelling with Xena is hard

Download and streaming at my journal

Sep. 22nd, 2017 10:52 am

Reading Friday!

frayadjacent: Connie Maheswaran on a beach reading excitedly (!reading)
[personal profile] frayadjacent
I've been travelling a lot, which means plenty of time for reading but not much for DW posting.

What I've finished reading since my last post:

Six Wakes by Mur Lafferty. What I thought would be a fun, tight-knit murder mystery turned out to be a big story covering hundreds of years, major political upheavals, and some thought-provoking ideas about clones. I enjoyed this a lot.

Redshirts by John Scalzi. It was a fun book and made me laugh, but as my first Scalzi novel, I can't say it made me want to read more.

The Thessaly series by Jo Walton (The Just City, The Philosopher Kings, and Necessity). An interesting series, especially as an exploration of utopia. I never thought I'd read a book that would make me excited about the god Apollo. I found that even though I wasn't enormously taken in by the plots or characters, I couldn't put them down, and I think that's just because the prose is so damn readable. I came to particularly love the character Maia, and was bummed that she wasn't in the last novel.

Lavinia, by Ursula K Le Guin. I've had the e-book for ages, and after I finished The Just City, but before I realised there were two more novels after it, I was in the mood for more Bronze Age fiction. Le Guin's prose is as wonderful as ever, and I loved the use of the device that Lavinia -- and everyone else -- was a character in the Aeneid, not a historical figure. I find Le Guin's tendency toward gender essentialism more annoying than I used to.

The Small Change trilogy by Jo Walton (Farthing, Ha'penny, and Half a Crown). Detective noir/political thriller series set in an AU where the UK made peace with the Nazis and the US never joined WWII. In the first book, one of the POV characters is happily married to a man with the same first and last name as Mr. Adjacent, and it was very strange! At several points I thought I'd have to stop reading it because this character was under serious threat and I thought he might die. The end of the series was narratively satisfying but politically annoying. Between this series and the Thessaly series I have read two instances in Walton where the oppressed and their allies basically convinced those in power (or rather, a sympathetic faction of those in power) to stop oppressing them. I'm with Fredrick Douglass on that one.

What I'm currently reading

My Real Children by Jo Walton. Yes, I'm on a kick. I've just started this, but I'm hoping it will be more the intimate, character-driven story that Among Others was. As much as I've enjoyed Walton's books that I've read since then, none of them can hold a candle to that one.

Also, I'm slowly re-reading Searoad: Chronicles of Klatsand by Ursula K Le Guin. I read it for the first (and only) time more than 15 years ago, so all I really remember is the overall feel of the book.

What I'll read next

I pre-ordered the new Philip Pullman book, La Belle Sauvage, and it will be arriving in less than a month. I told myself I'd re-read His Dark Materials first. Also, last year I purchased N.K. Jemisin's Obelisk Gate but decided to wait until the third book was out before reading the whole trilogy (including re-reading The Fifth Season). Now the third book is out but I haven't bought it yet. And finally, I have four books on hold from the library and I plan to drop anything else to read them once they become available. In other words, I don't know.

Free book-shaped space

I finally got my account set up to get e-books from the library and my book buying is plummeting (excepting the Le Guin haul, described below) while my reading rate soars. I'm so pleased.

I recently learned that Worldcon 77 (in 2019) will be in Dublin! I really really want to go -- Dublin is cheaper to get to than London and almost as easy -- but it's within a week of my 10-year wedding anniversary, when we are also planning a big trip. I know this is nearly two years away, but August always ends up filled with family travel, so I feel like I do have to plan this far in advance in order for it to happen.

I went to Portland, Oregon in August, for the first time since probably 2003. I went to Powell's and re-purchased many of the Le Guin books I'd gotten rid of in a misguided purge a few years ago. All the books I bought were used -- I prefer to buy used books anyway, but these were necessarily so since I bought out of print books. Anyway, my Le Guin library is slowly being restored. Also, I almost bought a few missing Earthsea novels, but then a guy at the checkout counter told me that next year they'll be releasing a new illustrated version of the series, so I decided to hold out for that. Speaking of, the fancy illustrated version of Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban is coming out soon. I seem to be collecting them all, but I'm really curious to see how they'll do the later books, as even The Philosopher's Stone is huge and unweildy.


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